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Case Studies


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Digital Ecosystems


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Retail


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From Acorns To Oak Trees: The Journey From Management Team To Board

Guy Rigby Thursday, 09 January 2014.

There comes a time in the development of a business when it is beneficial or deemed desirable by the shareholders – who are often the founders – for a distinction to be made between the role of the management team and the board.

management teamWhile the management team is focused on running the day to day activities of the business, the board is a more strategic grouping which is focused on making sure that the interests of the shareholders and other stakeholders are well served. As businesses grow, this two tier structure, which is an accepted feature of the public company arena, will normally emerge.

A board of directors is elected by and accountable to the shareholders, whereas the management team is chosen and appointed by the board of directors. The board of directors will typically include senior members of the management team, for example the CEO, CFO and COO (the 'executive directors'), and a number of external directors who are not part of the management team (the 'non-executive directors' or NEDs).

An important point to note from this structure is that the board is unlikely to be populated by the management team as a whole. It is only the key members of the management team that are likely to be represented.

The role of the board

There is a clear distinction between the role of the board and the role of the management team. In general, the board works on the business, whilst the management team work in the business.

The board is the most senior committee of the company, being the steering group that agrees the vision and values of the business and sets its strategy. It is ultimately about adding value. Those who sit on a company's board should be able to benefit the business through their collective expertise, experience, knowledge and contacts.

The board's responsibilities are wide, but key areas include:

• establishing the vision for the business, guiding its operations and communicating its
culture and values

• evaluating present and future opportunities, as well as identifying threats and weaknesses

• setting the strategy for the business

• ensuring that the structure of the business will enable it to pursue its strategy

• appointing and reviewing the performance of the company's CEO

• evaluating the quality and capability of the management team and their performance in
implementing and executing strategy

• monitoring the performance and liquidity of the business

• approving budgets and keeping proper accounts

• communicating with shareholders and stakeholders

The board should be proactive rather than reactive. Members should not only have a firm understanding of the core strategy and values, but should also have a good knowledge of the business KPIs, customer base, operating costs, and the financial and market position. This is so that they can identify and flag up areas of vulnerability or highlight threats and opportunities.

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Guy Rigby

Guy Rigby

Guy is an experienced chartered accountant and an entrepreneur. A natural and driven enthusiast, he built and sold his own accountancy firm, as well as pursuing other commercial interests. He has been a director and part owner of a number of different companies, including businesses in the IT, property, defence, manufacturing and retail sectors.

Guy joined Smith & Williamson in 2008 and leads the entrepreneurial services group. His day to day activities include advising entrepreneurs and their businesses and coordinating Smith & Williamson's activities in this increasingly important market.

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